Our exhibits interpret Kodiak’s Russian era (1741-1867), early American era (1867-1912) and modern era (1912-present). The Baranov Museum is operated in partnership between the Kodiak Historical Society, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, and the City of Kodiak.

Mission

The Kodiak Historical Society facilitates exploration of the natural, cultural, and artistic heritage of Kodiak Island and surrounding communities to create opportunities for the public to discover, share, and exchange knowledge using the collections and resources made available through the operation of the Baranov Museum.

History

Kodiak’s first museum, opened by the Kodiak Historical Society in 1957.

The Kodiak Historical Society was incorporated as a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization on September 21, 1954. The vision of the Society at incorporation was to preserve and share the history of the Kodiak and Aleutian Islands region. Within three years, the Society opened a museum – the Kodiak Museum – in a downtown WWII Quonset hut. Over the years, scores of volunteers contributed their time and family treasures to the growing organization.

The devastating effects of the 1964 Great Alaskan earthquake and tsunami. Kodiak Historical Society Guy Powell Collection P-846-72

The devastating effects of the 1964 Great Alaskan earthquake and tsunami. Kodiak Historical Society Guy Powell Collection P-846-72

The 1964 earthquake and tsunami was a pivotal event in the development of the Historical Society. Many families lost their homes and businesses. Entire villages on Kodiak Island were relocated. In the wake of this devastating natural disaster, the value of preserving community history was recognized. In ever increasing numbers, the people of Kodiak brought significant antiques, artwork and culturally meaningful artifacts to the Society, to be held in public trust.

The City of Kodiak from Pillar Mountain in 2012. Courtesy Discover Kodiak.

The City of Kodiak from Pillar Mountain in 2012. Courtesy Discover Kodiak.

In the rebuilding that followed the tsunami, many of Kodiak’s older buildings were demolished. When the old Russian American magazin in downtown Kodiak was threated, the community rallied to protect this representative of their past. Centennial funds from the State of Alaska in 1967 enabled the Kodiak Historical Society to renovate the log building. Support walls were removed and modern wall coverings were stripped away to reveal the original log structure and moss chinking. After much renovation and stabilization work, the collections of the Kodiak Historical Society were moved to their new home, and one of Alaska’s most unique museums opened its doors to the public.

 

Contact Us:

101 East Marine Way
Kodiak, AK 99615
(907) 486-5920

info@baranovmuseum.org